List of Teams in the 2016 Africa Women Cup of Nations


Cameroon: The Cameroon National Women’s Football Team, known as the Indomitable Lionesses of Cameroon is the National Team of Cameroon. Cameroon finished second in the 1991, 2004, and 2014 African Women’s Championship, participated in the 2012 Olympic Games and competed in their first ever FIFA Women’s World Cup in 2015 in Canada.

Cameroon Indomitable Lionnesses

Cameroon Indomitable Lionnesses

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nigeria: The Nigeria National Women’s Football Team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria.  They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semi-final of the 2008 Women’s African Football Championship and in May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

Nigerian Falcons

Nigerian Falcons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ghana: The Ghana Women’s National Football Team, nicknamed the Black Queens is the National Team of Ghana.

Ghana Black Queens

Ghana Black Queens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Egypt: The Egypt women’s national football team represents Egypt in international women’s football. It made its official debut in the 1998 African Championship, where it ended last in its group after beating Uganda in the qualifying round. As of 2013 it remains Egypt’s only appearance in the competition’s finals. After being knocked by Réunion in 2002 the team didn’t enter the next two editions in 2002 and 2004. In their return to the qualifiers in 2006 they were knocked out by Algeria. They subsequently withdrew from the qualifiers in 2008 and 2010, and they didn’t take part in the 2012 Summer Olympics qualifiers either.

In 2012 they made their fourth appearance in the African Championship’s qualifiers. They were knocked out by Ethiopia.

egypt-women-football-team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mali: The Mali Women’s National Football team is the national women’s football team of Mali. Mali played in the African Women’s Championship five times from 2002 to 2010 but never reached the knock-out stage.

Mali female Football team

Mali female Football team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kenya: The Kenya women’s National Football team represents Kenya in women’s football. The first women’s league in Kenya and national team were created in 1985 at a time when almost no country in the world had a women’s national football team. The national team is nicknamed the Harambee Starlets.

Kenya Harambee Starlets

Kenya Harambee Starlets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

South Africa: The South Africa national women’s football team, nicknamed Banyana Banyana (The Girls), is the national team of South Africa. Their first official match took place on 30 May 1993 against Swaziland.

They qualified for the Olympic football for the first time in the 2012 tournament, while at that time they had not yet qualified for FIFA Women’s World Cup.

South Africa's Banyana Banyana

South Africa’s Banyana Banyana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zimbabwe: The Zimbabwe Women’s National Football team is the national women’s football team of Zimbabwe. As of August 2013 they were ranked 83rd in the world.

Their first competitive international match was played in the 2000 African Women’s Championship, when they drew against Uganda 2–2 on 11 November 2000. They actually were in the draw for the 1991 edition, but withdrew from the tournament before playing a match.

Their best result in the African Women’s Championship was 4th in 2000. They have never qualified for the World Cup. They qualified for the 2016 Olympic football tournament, and finished last in their group (containing Canada, Germany, and Australia) after losing 6–1 to Germany, 3–1 to Canada and 6–1 to Australia.

Zimbabwe Women's National Football team

Zimbabwe Women’s National Football team

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